Hit the Books: Summer Reading List

Over a million new titles are published annually in the United States, far more than even most of them can pass. Even with a weekly posting schedule, we can only save you 52 every year. To help highlight all the great stories that otherwise wouldn’t be featured in our weekly column, we’re bringing you now hit quarterly booksa semi-annual report for books that may not be strictly tech-related but we think you’ll love nonetheless.

Choosing this version runs the color gamut from STEM to Sci-Fi including selections from The New York Times Bestselling author John Scalzi, UC Berkeley professor of sociology Carolyn Chen, and journalist Stephen Waite. We hope you enjoy.

It's so yellow

It’s so yellow

by Caroline Chen

Silicon Valley may tout itself as the Emerald City at the end of America’s yellow-brick road, but one only needs to pull the curtain to find the oppressive capitalist machine hidden behind it. In her new book, Carolyn Chen, professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, studies how the industry is already primed for cult. It steadily imposed itself on the religious beliefs and practices of its workers, promoting neighboring Buddhist “wellness programs” in hopes of achieving productive enlightenment. What, did you think the Communion Town would not include the Communion Church?

How Music Got Free Cover

How Music Got Free Cover

by Stephen Witt

In the early days of social media, just as the popularity of physical media began to wane but long before the advent of ubiquitous streaming services, there was a time of limitless possibilities. It was a time when absolutely any song could be yours, for free and at the click of a button, assuming at least one person on your network had a full copy. Many music groups were assembled during the era of unregulated file sharing, much to the chagrin of the record industry. But no one has pirated music anywhere near the Dell Glover scale. In his 2016 book, , journalist Stephen Waite explains how Glover used his position at work at a North Carolina CD factory to steal and leak more than 2,000 surreptitious albums over a decade before he was caught. Someone get this guy’s medal.

Kaiju Preservation Society cover

Kaiju Preservation Society cover

by John Scalzi

Stuck in a dead-end gig job amid the depths of the first COVID lockdown, Jamie Gray is searching for an exit, that is, from his bleak, cash-strapped existence. Unfortunately for him, he’s on the verge of getting exactly what he wants the latest from John Scalzi, The New York Times Bestselling author old man war And the redshirts.

Imagine the women of Walt Disney

Imagine the women of Walt Disney

Walt Disney may have carried the initial spark of inspiration for what would eventually become one of the world’s largest media empires, but since he began his cold storage business, the responsibility to bring these stories, rides, and attractions to life has fallen to the company’s legion of designers, manufacturers, and builders. Enthusiasts: The Imagineers. Walt Disney Women Imagine It gathers first-hand stories from the dozens of women who worked behind the scenes and struggled in the male-dominated industry to ensure that Disney theme parks live up to their reputation as the most magical place on Earth.

Gone World cover is so scary

Gone World cover is so scary

by Tom Sweeterlitsch

In this time-traveling thriller, NCIS Special Agent Shannon Moss is tasked with uncovering why a private marine killed his family – and the place where his teenage daughter went missing. Exploiting the world’s “deep time” phenomenon for temporal navigation, Moss transcends the fourth dimension, navigating alternate realities in search of clues to the killer’s motives. That is, until you stumble upon a future event that could wipe out humanity completely.

Got a recommendation for a book you can’t let go of? Leave us a line about it and we may just include it in a future roundup!